Research Team

Faculty

Dr. Patricia Boechler

Dr. Patricia Boechler
Director, Technology and Learning Sciences Lab
Associate Professor, Educational Psychology Educational Psychology
patricia.boechler@ualberta.ca

Research Interests

Dr. Boechler’s educational background is in psychology and cognitive science with a research focus on cognition, learning and technology. She has training and experience in the areas of cognitive theory and testing, learning theory, computational modeling as well as experience in investigating navigation and learning with educational technologies such as multimedia, web-based learning, virtual reality applications, learning management systems. Dr. Boechler’s research has been interdisciplinary, incorporating aspects of psychology, technology and education, particularly in investigating cognitive and educational frameworks that can inform our use of emerging technologies. Dr. Boechler is interested in understanding how various technologies (websites, video games,) can be optimized for educational purposes. Below is a list of her current and ongoing projects:

  • Virtual World, Game-based Social Skills Interventions for Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Adolescents
  • Place-based Learning in Virtual Environments
  • Digital Literacy Measures
  • Using video game creation in the classroom for teaching and learning
  • Implicit learning of information in educational websites and virtual worlds and its relation to cognitive styles, literacy and spatial skills
  • Virtual world student orientation to postsecondary education
  • A series of studies on older adults and computer use focusing on correlations between various cognitive skills and perceptual abilities, and performance on computer tasks.
  • Video game use and its effects on attributions of aggression and cognitive reasoning.

Academic Qualifications

  • Ph.D. University of Alberta, 2002- Cognitive Psychology Dissertation Title: Hypertext navigation tools as mechanisms for the investigation of hyperspace properties: Spatial and conceptual relations, metric space and mental representation.
  • B.A. University of Saskatchewan, 1993

Courses Taught

  • EDIT 486 – Interactive Multimedia – Video Games for Teaching and Learning
  • EDU 575 – Theory and Practice in Educational Technology
  • EDPY 497 – Psychological Theory and Technology in Education
  • EDPY 524 – The Psychology of Technology-based Learning
  • EDPY 509 – Child Development: Theories and Issues
  • EDPY 402 – Child Development for Educators
  • EDU 510 – Fundamentals of Educational Research

Dr. Catherine Adams

Cathy Adams
Coordinator, MEd Technology in Education Specialization
Associate Professor, Secondary Education
cathy.adams@ualberta.ca

Research Interests

Drawing on links between phenomenology, philosophy of technology, pedagogy, and media scholarship, Dr. Adams’ research program addresses digital media technology integration across K -12 and post-secondary educational settings; Ethical and pedagogical issues involving digital media in schools; Media ecology and critical media studies; Phenomenology, Actor-Network Theory (ANT), and related qualitative research methodologies for studying technologies in education; Aesthetics of educational software architectures; K-12 Computing Science education. Dr. Adams coordinates the Faculty of Education’s Master of Education in Technology in Education. She is the Pedagogy Editor for Explorations in Media Ecology. Her current research projects include phenomenological investigations of Learning Management Systems, Interactive Whiteboards (IWBs), and Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs).

Academic Qualifications

  • Ph.D., University of Alberta, 2008, Dissertation: PowerPoint and the Pedagogy of Digital Media Technology
  • Master of Adult Education, St. Francis Xavier University, 1995, Thesis: Transforming Teaching Practice Through Metaphor
  • B.Sc., University of Alberta, 1981, Computing Science

Courses Taught

Undergraduate Courses

  • EDSE 317 – Curriculum and Teaching in Secondary School Career and Technology Studies I
  • EDSE 417 – Curriculum and Teaching in Secondary School Career and Technology Studies II (Business, Administration, Finance; Computing Science; Media; Communication Arts)
  • EDSE 451– Integrating Theory and Classroom Practice in the Advanced Professional Term (Business, Administration, Finance; Computing Science; Media; Communication Arts)

Graduate Courses

  • EDSE 510 – Research Methods in Secondary Education
  • EDSE 577 – Pedagogy of Technology: Teachers and Students as Cyborgs
  • EDSE 611 – Phenomenological Research & Writing
  • EDU 575 – Theory and Practice in Educational Technology

Dr. Mike Carbonaro

Dr. Michael Carbonaro
Professor
Educational Psychology
mike.carbonaro@ualberta.ca

Research Interests

Dr. Mike Carbonaro is a professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta. His research can be classified into several intersecting areas that include: curriculum design, computer games in schools, blended instructional delivery, robotics, computational modeling, health sciences interprofessional education, and, Aboriginal education. Prior to his university appointment, Dr. Carbonaro spent four years in industry developing simulation-based training systems for the Canadian military. His early research was on the development of neural network models of cognition. In 2001 he introduced the first university level Education course in Canada that explored the use of LEGO robotic technology at the k-12 level ¬creating momentum for widespread use of this technology throughout the province. Since 2004 he has been collaborating with colleagues in the Department of Computing Science, Drs. Jonathan Schaeffer and Duane Szafron, on the ScriptEase research project www.cs.ualberta.ca/~script/. In 2005 he designed and implemented a Faculty of Education Master’s program in area of Educational Technology that has graduated 29 students. From 2006-2010 he helped to develop a new graduate interprofessional program in Health Sciences Education and the creation of an educational research facility Health Sciences Educational Research Commons (HSERC). He is part of a research team that was awarded a major grant for the development of simulation-based training scenarios in Health Sciences. Dr Carbonaro also led a project to develop new blended delivery instructional models for interprofessional health sciences education. Since 2010 Dr. Carbonaro (with colleagues Drs., Stroulia and Szafron in the Department of Computing Science) has been a Collaborative Network Investigator (CNI) on two Graphics Animation and New Media (GRAND) projects. GRAND is a federally-funded Network of Centres of Excellence that supports 34 research projects divided into 5 cross-pollinating themes involving researchers at 25 universities across Canada with more than 60 industry, government, and nonprofit partners. Dr. Carbonaro’s two CNI projects are: 1) BELIEVE: Believable Characters, Behaviors and Stories in Story-based Games; 2) HLTHSIM: Multi-Modal Augmented Reality for Training Healthcare Professionals. Research from these two GRAND projects has produced 12 papers published in top venues. Recently he has been collaborating with Aboriginal colleagues at Blue Quills First Nations College to develop e-pedagogical strategies to support the Faculty of Education cohort-based Aboriginal Teacher Education Program (ATEP).

Academic Qualifications

  • Ph.D. University of Alberta 1997 Educational Psychology, Basic Area Dissertation Title: Computational Modeling of Concept Attainment
  • M.Sc. University of Alberta 1993 Computing Science, Artificial Intelligence Project title: Human-Computer Collaboration as a Paradigm for Knowledge-Base Systems: Compensating for Cognitive Biases
  • B.A. York University 1991 Computer Science
  • M.Ed. University of Alberta 1988 Educational Psychology, Computer-Based Instruction Thesis title: Computerized Test Item Banking: Features
  • B.Ed. University of Alberta 1984 Secondary Biological Sciences

Dr. Jason Harley

Dr. Jason Harley
Assistant Professor
Educational Psychology
jharley1@ualberta.ca

Research Interests

Dr. Jason M. Harley is an incoming tenure-track assistant professor in the Educational Technology Program and Educational Psychology Department at the University of Alberta. He is currently a postdoctoral fellow in the Computer Science and Operations Research Department at the University of Montreal and research associate at McGill University in the Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology. He completed his Ph.D. in Educational Psychology at McGill in the summer of 2014 and his MA in the same program and department in the fall of 2011. His research examines emotions, self and co-regulated learning, and advanced learning technologies, including intelligent tutoring systems, games, and mobile augmented reality. He has published two editorials, nineteen handbook chapters, journal articles, and conference proceedings, and presented or co-authored thirty-six conference papers in peer-reviewed, international venues in education, psychology, and computer science. He has contributed to numerous research projects that have been funded by American and Canadian funding agencies and has been awarded doctoral and postdoctoral fellowships from the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC), and a Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canadian Graduate Scholarship (CGS) from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). You can learn more about his scientific work that explores the intersections between advanced technology, psychological processes, and education on his website https://sites.google.com/site/jasonmharley/.

Ph.D. Students

Bryan Braul

Bryan Braul

Doctoral Student
Educational Psychology

Bryan Braul has been an E-Learning Developer with Faculty of Extension for 13 years. He works in the areas of instructional design, online course development and instructor training and support. He is presently enrolled in a PhD program in Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta. His research interests are in the development of formal online learning communities and the development of online teacher/student presence.

Erik deJong

Erik deJong

Doctoral Student
Educational Psychology

Erik deJong is a PhD student in Educational Psychology. He was previously awarded his Masters of Education in Technology in Education from the University of Alberta, also through the department of Educational Psychology. Previous to this, Erik completed his Undergraduate in Secondary Education, with a Major in Social Studies and a Minor in Mathematics, and also holds a diploma as an Electronics Engineering Technologist. While working to complete his academic goals, Erik has been a part of research projects that have included studies on the cutting edge of educational research. These include: the educational opportunities and affordances provided by Virtual Worlds in both formal education applications and those related to Health Sciences, as well as the value of constructivist tools such as video games and robotics and their possible role in the classroom. Erik’s current academic interests remain firmly grounded in field of technology in education. He has been a sessional instructor, for a number of years, of a course entitled Interactive Multimedia: Video Games and Learning, offered through the department of Educational Psychology, a course he was privileged to help develop, in small part, while acting as the Teaching Assistant to Drs. Boechler and Carbonaro for six consecutive terms.

Karon Dragon

Karon Dragon

Doctoral Student
Educational Psychology

Karon Dragon is a doctoral student in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta. She is also a practicing provisional psychologist with an area of focus on assessing culturally diverse individuals and at-risk learners in school and post secondary populations. Her current research focuses on pedagogical uses of technology in post secondary settings, with broader interests centered around technology-based education, educational assessment, and theories of learning. Related areas of interest include misidentification and disproportionality in clinical practice

Luis Fernando Marin

Luis Fernando Picture

Doctoral Student
Educational Psychology

Luis F. Marin is a PhD student in Psychological Studies in Education, Research. Recently graduated from his M.Ed.,Technology in Education at the UofA. He has supported different instructional activities for EDU 210 Introduction to Educational Technology for the past two years. Through his research he has explored instructional possibilities of Augmented Reality (AR), uses of mind mapping for understanding, and the artful or playful uses of technology. His Master's thesis "Theoretical Bases of Understanding Blended Learning and Instructional Design" explores how to optimize the quality of the design of a blended learning experience, including the design of instructional hypermedia. His long term research interest is to learn how to observe the key learning constructs of satisfaction, performance, understanding and collaboration and their relation to changes in the design of instruction. His LinkedIn profile can be found here.

Ewa Wasniewski

Ewa Wasniewski

Doctoral Student
Educational Psychology

Ewa Wasniewski is currently a PhD student in Educational Psychology specializing in Educational Technologies.

She has a BPE, BEd., Diploma in Special and Inclusive Education, MEd in Educational Technologies. Her areas of research interest are Mobile Learning, Digital Literates, Assistive Technologies, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, Program Evaluation, Learning Management Systems, Virtual Realities and Community Engagement. Ewa has had TA Experience in EDPY 200- Psychology for Teachers, EDPY 301 Teaching Students with Disabilities, EDPY 404 Adolescent Development, EDPY 454 Teaching Students Challenging Behaviours, EDPY 497 Psychological Theory and Technology in Education, EDPY 597 Educational Psychology and Technology. She has also held research assistantships on projects in Virtual Learning Environments, FASD Report, Community Housing Initiative, Digital Literacy, Blended Learning, and Continuing Education Community Engagement.

Connie Yuen

Connie Yuen

Doctoral Student
Educational Psychology

Connie Yuen is a PhD student in PSE Research specializing in Technology in Education. Her research interests includes professional development in educational technologies, serious games, design thinking and makerspaces. Over the last few years she has also represented fellow Educational Psychology graduate students as the GSA Councillor and PSE/Tech in Ed Area Rep. Her Master's thesis (University of Alberta) focused on the nexus of technology-based educational psychology, multi-tasking and virtual worlds. She also has a Bachelor’s degree in Secondary Education with a specialization in Career and Technology Studies.

Connie’s research and teaching assistantships include EDIT 486 Interactive Multimedia and Video Games, EDIT 202 Technology Tools for Teaching and Learning, EDEL 325 Pedagogy and Curriculum in Music, Alberta Education Learning and Technology Policy Framework Evaluation, Virtual Campus Orientation, Virtual Environment Social Skills Training for Adolescents with FASD, Digital Learning Pilots for Blended Education, Advancing Adolescent Reading Initiative, etc.

Additionally, Connie worked at various organizations supporting technology integration and teaching at the Centre for Teaching & Learning (U of A), EdTech Services (Faculty of Education), Edmonton Public Library (Digital Literacy Initiatives - Makerspace), Department of Computing Science (U of A) and Edmonton Public Schools.

M.Ed. Students

Mariam Abdi

No Picture

MEd in Technology in Education
Educational Psychology

Mariam Abdi enrolled in the Master of Education program in January 2014, specializing in Educational Technology with the department of Educational Psychology.

She holds a Bachelor degree in Computer Science from Carleton University in Ottawa, and has worked as a software developer with Statistics Canada for twelve years before moving to Edmonton with her husband and two young boys. After months of self-searching and "now what do I do next" sessions, she decided to embark on a new and a totally unexpected adventure: graduate studies!

During her internship with the School Technology Branch at Alberta Education in the 2014 fall term, she worked on a research project on cloud privacy in Alberta's K-12 schools. She currently works as a teaching assistant for the course EDIT 486/EDPY 597 - Interactive Multimedia: Video Gaming for Teaching and Learning.

Corbett Artym

Corbett Artym

MEd in Technology in Education
Educational Psychology

Corbett Artym defended his thesis January 2015 completing his masters in the Technology in Education program in Educational Psychology. He completed his undergraduate degree at the U of A in Science, double-majoring in Computing Science and Mathematics. His research interests are constructionist learning using digital games and LEGO robotics, computational thinking, and blended delivery-style learning. He has been a teaching assistant for:

  • EDIT 486/EDPY 597: Interactive Multimedia,
  • EDCT 400/EDCT 500: Robotics: Constructionism in Practice,
  • EDPY 301: Inclusive Education: Adapting Instruction for Students with Special Needs and
  • EDPY 305: Learning, Instructional Practice, and Educational Psychology.

Corbett worked on the Digital Learning Pilots (DLP) for the blended delivery remodel of both EDPY 301 and 305. He has been the Provost Digital Learning Committee (PDLC) as the Graduate Student Representative and served as the Technology in Education Area Representative on the EDPY GSA.

David Hay

David Hay

MEd in Technology in Education
Educational Psychology

David Hay is an Innovation Consultant with Elk Island Public Schools, where he is tasked with both encouraging staff and students to try new things and expediting processes to make that possible.

He holds B.Sc. and B.Ed. degrees from the University of Alberta and is currently completing his M.Ed.

Katelyn Loshny

Katelyn Poster

MEd in Technology in Education
Educational Psychology

Katelyn Loshny completed her Bachelors of Secondary Education in 2011 and is about complete her masters in the Technology in Education program in April 2015. Throughout graduate school, Katelyn has worked for the Rehabilitation Sciences Department, the Special Education Department, and the Educational Psychology department as a Research Assistant and Teaching Assistant. Presently, Katelyn is completing her own research project where she is constructing and testing an assessment tool for to evaluate student learning when using different assistive technologies, namely robotics.

Lance Pederson

No Picture

MEd in Technology in Education
Educational Psychology

Lance Pederson has been a Computer Science teacher with Edmonton Public Schools (EPSB) for the past 8 years. He is also the past president and founding member of the Computer Science Teacher's Association of Alberta (CSTAAB), which was the first Canadian branch of CSTA. His focus remains with the Computer Science discipline, but also works to bring technologies to the school environment whenever practical and applicable.

Cody Steinke

Cody Steinke

MEd in Technology in Education
Educational Psychology

Cody Steinke is a 2012 Bachelor in Education graduate currently in his second year of the Technology in Education graduate studies program. In the past he has worked on projects involving blended delivery for the course EDSE 307, has worked for the Computer Science department as a Summer Camp lead instructor for four years, and has worked as a TA for EDCT 500- Robotics in Education. Presently he serves as a TA for EDIT 486- INteracive Learning- Video Games for Teaching and Learning and as a RA in an online interactive map project with Dr. Mackey in the School of Library and Information Studies.

Francisco Vargas

Fran Picture

MEd in Technology in Education
Educational Psychology

L. Francisco Vargas M. finished his M.Ed. in Technology in Education in 2014. He completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Costa Rica in Psychology. His research interests include online learning, 21st century skills, and assistive technology. His licence study examined the impact of online communication on dimensions such as satisfaction, interpersonal relationships, well-being, as well as productivity. His masters' study examined the lived experience of closeness in online learning environments for students. His research assistantships include:

  • The Lived Code/Space of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)
  • Motivation, Engagement and Learning in DINO 101: Students’ Lived and Perceived Experiences in a Massive Open Online Course
  • Flexible Pathways to Success: Technology to Design for Diversity